John Komor

John Komor

Dear Aulay:

Thank you for your e-mail.  My last name is spelled “Komor”,  not “Kormor” so if you add my name to the list please use the correct spelling.  My sister’s name could be put as “Natalie Komor”, and my name as “John Komor”. Unfortunately my sister passed away some years ago but she would have been interested in seeing the Manumit information site. I was in the dorm I believe on the 3rd floor of the main building, the 2nd floor was for girls if my memory is right.  On the 3rd floor boys dorm our dorm-master was Andy Shiga.  Andy was a Japanese-American who spoke some Japanese so we got on very well. To the best of my recollection my sister and I were at Manumit in 1948 or 1949 for the school year and for the summer-camp.  Since my family lived in Japan my legal guardian was a person named Max Blum of New York City.  Although I was born and raised in Japan I am not Japanese but am American – a Causacian.  My family has old roots in Japan which is the reason I came to Manumit from Japan and returned to Japan afterwards. It was nice hearing from you. Kind regards John Komor.Dear John:   I don’t remember you I’m sorry to say but I do remember your sister very well. She was in my dorm and I recall her quietness and her shyness and nice disposition..  Thanks for the contact.  Thelma Adelman O’BrienDear Thelma: thank you for your e-mail.  I was  7 years younger that my sister, Natalie, so you would not have associated with me, but Natalie did talk about her dorm-mates and I recall the name Thelma Adelman as being one of Natalie’s favorite classmates.  We often discussed our Manumit days during Natalie’s lifetime so you were in our discussions.  Thank you for taking the time & trouble to e-mail me. Kindest regards John Komor.John,You could not find yourself or your sister in the class lists because we are missing the ’47-’48 and ’48-’49 class rosters when you would been 12 or 13 years old. My guess is that you were twelve which would explain way you were in the main house during the school year and in the chicken coop (near the barn) the following summer. I was thirteen and in the barn or chicken coop with the “adolescent” boys in the ’48-’49 school year.I never had Andy Shiga as a dorm counselor but I was very fond of him. He thought me how to say “good morning” and “thank you very much” in Japanese which I remember to this day. Andy was short (like me) and I admired his prowess on the football field. As I recall he played football for Oregon or Washington State University. He could also do push-ups while I sat on his back … I was well over 120 pounds at thirteen.One day Andy came to visit me when I was sick in the infirmary in the main house. He was chewing on something which turned out to be dried or smoked squid. He let me taste it and I really liked it. That summer when visiting California, I talked my uncle into buying and letting me “cook” some squid. Of course I had no idea how to prepare it and just put the raw squid in a frying pan on the oven. The vaporizing ink from the squid practically caused us all to abandon the house.Do you remember Ann Fincke, the art teacher? She was Billy Fincke’s daughter by a first marriage. I think that Don Silverstien and John Lindlof may also have been counselors and teachers at Manumit when you were there. I’m not sure that they gave “grades” in the “lower” school (1st through 8th grades). Maybe that’s why you don’t remember them.Your family’s history in Japan sounds very interesting. Your own experience in Japan as an American boy soon after WW II must have been unique!

Best,
Ferdie John

I was born in June of 1935 so I’m a little older than you. We must have overlapped at Manumit. I went to Manumit from the fall of 1945 to the spring of 1952 … but never to the summer camp. I remember the year 1948 fairly well. Did you live in the chicken coop or the barn? Do you have a picture of yourself and/or of your sister from your Manumit days? If so, why don’t you send it to Aulay Carlson so that he can put it up on the web site? What got your family to Japan? I’m curious.

Regards, Ferdin and (Ferdie) Scharf

Dear Ferdie

Thanks for your e-mail and am pleased to note you remember Andy Shiga who was my dorm-master when I was at Manumit in 1948 on the 3rd Floor of the Main Building during the school year.  I noted with interest that you had some dried squid which he gave you. It is possible I am the one who gave him the squid, which we toasted over an electric heater he had in his room.  The squid, of course, was sent to me by my parents along with various other Japanese foods such as Nori (dried seaweed), Sembe (rice cakes), etc.  And, of course, the dried squid. You really have a good memory to remember Andy, he was a nice quiet person.

With kind regards
John Komor

 

Dear Thelma:

Thank you for your e-mail.  I was  7 years younger that my sister, Natalie, so you would not have associated with me, but Natalie did talk about her dorm-mates and I recall the name Thelma Adelman as being one of Natalie’s favorite classmates.  We often discussed our Manumit days during Natalie’s lifetime so you were in our discussions.  Thank you for taking the time & trouble to e-mail me.

Kindest regards
John Komor.